Easy Natural Food

Healthy everyday meal ideas

Month: February 2012 (page 1 of 2)

Creamy Coleslaw

I’ve been on a bit of a coleslaw kick lately. It all came about as one of those happy coincidences. I had recently learnt to make my own mayonnaise, and I also happened to have some cabbage in the fridge which was earmarked for sauerkraut, but plans do change sometimes 🙂

Alot of my meals follow the old “protein, carbs and veges/salad” formula, but we don’t have many cooked vege sides (hubby prefers his veg raw) so I usually end up doing a salad. But I didn’t feel like a salad that day and I was poking around in the fridge hoping for inspiration. I saw my homemade mayo, I saw my cabbage, I saw the eggs, the milk, the maple syrup etc etc etc. Then I looked at the cabbage again, and remembered about the mayo, and a lightbulb went off. COLESLAW!!!

My husband and I can’t get enough of this coleslaw. I’m making it at least once a week and we chow down the entire bowl in a single meal. Which is a good thing, because cabbage offers so many health benefits. Like other members of the cruciferous vegetable family, cabbage has a lot of cancer-fighting properties – it is full ofantioxidants, anti-inflammatory compounds and glucosinolates, which are sulfur-containing compounds which help the body to detox. Cabbage is also very high in vitamin C and vitamin K.

Different varieties of cabbage offer slightly different benefits, so don’t forget to try some of the other cabbage varieties such as red, napa, savoy etc. in addition to the more common green cabbage.

Coleslaw

3 cups (approx) finely shredded cabbage (green, red, savoy, combination etc)
1 medium carrot, peeled and grated
ÂĽ cup raisins
½ cup (approx) homemade mayonnaise – recipe below

Mix all ingredients together in a bowl!

You can use your favorite homemade mayonnaise, or here’s my recipe if you need one:

Homemade Mayo

Makes 1 cup
1 whole egg and 1 egg yolk, at room temperature (important to use a good quality egg from a pastured hen!)
3 teaspoons prepared mustard (plain or Dijon)
3 teaspoons liquid raw honey
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
1/8 teaspoon sea salt
3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil (or blend of olive and expeller-pressed sunflower oil)

1. Blend egg, mustard, honey, lemon juice and salt until smooth (I use an immersion blender).
2. While the immersion blender is running on low, hold it with one hand and slowly pour in the olive oil with your other hand until all oil has been poured in. By the time you’re finished pouring, the mayonnaise will have magically thickened!.
3. Check seasonings and add more salt/lemon juice/mustard/honey to taste.
4. Pour into a jar and store in the fridge where it will keep for up to two weeks.

Note: If you don’t have an immersion blender, you can also make this in a food processor by slowly pouring in the oil through the opening while the motor is running.

It's good with red cabbage too!

Linking to: Real Food Wednesday @ Kelly the Kitchen Kop, Whole Food Wednesday @ Beyond the Peel, Pennywise Platter Thursdays @ Nourishing Gourmet, Full Plate Thursday @ Miz Helen’s Country Cottage, Freaky Friday @ Real Food Freaks, Friday Food Flicks @ Traditional Foods, Fight Back Fridays @ Food Renegade, Monday Mania @ Healthy Home Economist, Homestead Barnhop @ The Prairie Homestead, Make Your Own Mondays, Real Food 101 @ Ruth’s Real Food

Faux Pho

Ha ha, my husband has a sense of humor, doesn’t he? He came up with the name for this soup, not because he didn’t like it (we both really enjoyed it), but because I didn’t make an authentic Pho. I didn’t attempt to make authentic Pho on purpose because I already had some beef broth and I didn’t want to make a new batch of broth specifically for Pho. So instead, I cheated by adding the key spices to my beef broth, and simmering it for about an hour and a half to impart the flavor of the spices. Making a proper Pho stock is fairly involved and is typically made in a big batch, with steps like charring onion and ginger over an open flame!

Pho is a Vietnamese noodle soup that is usually served with beef (pho bo) or chicken (pho ga). The soup itself is simply the flavorsome broth with noodles and meat. But a bowl of Pho can be jazzed up as much or as little as you like by providing a plate of optional garnishes at the table and letting each person flavor their Pho according to their tastes.

My picture of this wonderful soup isn’t the best, because I was a bit heavy-handed with the greens. But it still tasted delicious!

Faux Pho

Soup:
6 cups homemade beef stock
1 inch piece of fresh ginger, sliced
1 star anise
1 cinnamon stick (about 2 inches)
4 cloves
6 black peppercorns
1 cardamom pod
½ to 1 tsp. Sucanat or palm/coconut sugar
2 Tbsp. fish sauce
4 oz (½ pack) maifun rice noodles
Âľ lb grass-fed steak (sirloin, London broil or flat iron are good choices) thinly sliced across the grain (easier to do if the meat is partially frozen)

Optional Garnishes:
Mung bean sprouts
Scallions
Cilantro
Mint
Basil
Hoisin sauce
Chili sauce (or Sriracha sauce)
Lime wedges

1. Heat stock in a large pot and add all of the spices. Simmer for at least an hour, preferably 1 1/2 hours, to allow the flavor of the spices to permeate into the stock.
2. Add the sugar and fish sauce to taste.
3. Remove the ginger and whole spices (I fished them out with a tea strainer, but easier to have made a spice bundle using cheesecloth).
4. Boil the jug to get some hot water. Place the rice noodles in a bowl and pour the boiled water over the noodles and let them sit for a couple minutes to soften. This works for the very thin rice noodles that I used. If you’re using thicker rice noodles they will need a little more cooking first.
5. Divide the noodles between the individual serving bowls.
6. Divide the thinly sliced raw meat across the bowls.
7. Bring broth to a rolling boil, then ladle some into each bowl, taking care to fully cover all of the beef so that the raw beef will cook. This is why its important to slice the meat very thin!
8. Allow each person to garnish their bowl of Pho according to their tastes.

If you’re interested in making Pho but want to make the proper Pho stock, here are two links that I found to be really helpful:
http://www.vietworldkitchen.com/blog/2008/10/pho-beef-noodle-soup.html
http://steamykitchen.com/271-vietnamese-beef-noodle-soup-pho.html

Linking to: Sunday Night Soup Night!, Sunday School @ Butter Believer, Monday Mania @ Healthy Home Economist, Homestead Barnhop @ The Prairie Homestead, Make Your Own Mondays, Fat Tuesday @ Real Food Forager, Traditional Tuesdays @ Cooking Traditional Foods, Real Food Wednesday @ Kelly the Kitchen Kop, Whole Food Wednesday @ Beyond the Peel, Pennywise Platter Thursdays @ Nourishing Gourmet, Full Plate Thursday @ Miz Helen’s Country Cottage, Freaky Friday @ Real Food Freaks, Friday Food Flicks @ Traditional Foods, Fight Back Fridays @ Food Renegade

Sunday Night Soup Night! 2/26/2012

Welcome to Sunday Night Soup Night!

Sunday Night Soup Night is all about celebrating the goodness of wonderful homemade soups and stocks. Warm, tasty soup, made from homemade stock can be a complete and highly nourishing meal. And also an easy and convenient one!

Thank you for the wonderful selection of soups last week. I love the never-ending variety and creativity when it comes to soup and I always find plenty of inspiration for my next bowl. Here are my top 3 pics from last Sunday. I hope you’ll take the time to check them out:

Courgette, Leek and Asparagus Soup by The Fussiest Eater


This soup looks so creamy and delicious, definitely a soup I plan to make when asparagus becomes available at my farmers market!

Delightful English Watercress Soup by Forgotten Domestic Arts


This is another soup that’s giving me good spring vibes. I’m going to be on the lookout for watercress too!

Coconut Saffron Shrimp Soup by Pickle Me Too


I’m sure this soup would have my taste buds singing! Shrimp, coconut, saffron…sounds so good!

So come join in the fun and share this celebration of soup:
– Link up a recipe for homemade soup, stock/broth or chowder.
– Or you may have a post your wish to share about your tips/methods for making great soups and stocks, or information about the benefits of nourishing soups and bone broths.
– Or simply get inspired by checking out the links from other bloggers.
– If you see something that you like, leave a comment for that person on their blog and let them know you found them through Sunday Night Soup Night! It’s always great to get positive feedback 🙂

Carnival Guidelines:
1) Please, no bouillon or commercial stock/broth! Soup made from homemade stock/bone broth is so much more nourishing than anything you can buy in the supermarket. If you’re not sure how to make your own stock, here are a few great posts on stock-making that have been linked to this carnival (I will rotate the links each week to highlight different stock recipes):

Chicken Stock by Nourishing Food Ways
How to Make Beef Stock by Our Nourishing Roots
Incredible Healing Properties of Broth by Nourish to Flourish

2) Whole, unprocessed foods only please! Low-fat milk, bad fats such as margarine and other processed vegetable oils, soy products (other than traditionally fermented soy foods such as soy sauce, tempeh, miso etc) are not ok. Minimally processed canned foods such as tomatoes, coconut milk, pumpkin, etc are ok.

I’m looking for soups that embrace real food principles and traditional food techniques such as homemade stock. Soups that will nourish, heal, and keep you in good health 🙂

3) Please provide a link back to Sunday Night Soup Night on your post.

4) Link up using the Linky tool below:
– Make sure you link the URL of your actual blog post and not your blog’s home page.
– Enter the title of your post instead of your name in the Name field


Beet and Cabbage Kraut

Beet Cabbage KrautRecently I posted about how I make sauerkraut. When it comes to vegetable ferments I mostly make sauerkraut, but I love to mix it up a little for variety and flavor. One of my favorite things to do is to add grated beets.

Beets are wonderfully cleansing, and they add a lovely touch of sweetness and an added dimension to the flavor of the ferment. I LOVE this ferment! I’ve actually nearly finished it already, and I’m going to make another one exactly like it!

I followed my sauerkraut recipe except I added grated beets (obviously!) and I had also started chopping up the cabbage before I realized that I didn’t have any whey! So I used a bit of extra salt and it worked out perfectly.

Beet and Cabbage Kraut

1 medium cabbage (I used green)
2 medium beets, peeled and grated
3 1/2 teaspoons fine-ground sea salt
1-2 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped (optional)
1-2 teaspoons Caraway seeds (optional)
Extra salt and water as needed for brine
1/4 cup whey (optional – I didn’t have any and it still worked just fine)

1. Finely chop up the cabbage. As your chopping board fills up with cabbage, toss it into a large bowl (or pot). Add the grated beets on top. Sprinkle over the salt, garlic and carraway seeds.

2. Wash your hands, roll up your sleeves and start scrunching that cabbage with your hands! As you go, mix everything together really well so that the salt, cabbage and grated beets are mixed together really well. Do this for about 5-10 minutes. If you tilt the bowl and move the cabbage out of the way, you should start to see juice collecting in the bottom of the bowl.

3. When everything has been mixed and scrunched really well, and you have juice collecting in the bottom of your bowl, you’re ready to transfer the contents to the jar that it will ferment in.

Note: It’s important to use a glass jar as opposed to a plastic or metallic container because the glass is non-reactive and won’t interfere with the fermentation process. Also, make sure you have a way of weighing down the contents while they’re fermenting.

4. Pack the contents into the jar tightly to remove as many air pockets as possible. When I made this batch, the juice was barely reaching the top of the vegetables, so I added 2 cups of brine (1 cup of brine = 1 teaspoon sea salt dissolved in 1 cup filtered water). I added 2 cups of brine instead of 1 cup because I wanted lots of liquid (sometimes I like to add a couple spoonfuls of the fermented juice to my smoothies).

I then added a glass (or you could use a glass jar) to weigh down the vegetables, which caused the level of the brine to cover the vegetables (apart from a few floaters!).

5. I then covered it and put it in away in the coat cupboard (my usual fermenting spot because its cool and has an even temperature!) for a week.

6. A week later I removed it from the cupboard and here’s the before and after shots:

As you can see, the brine level rose as the salt continued to pull water out of the vegetables during the fermentation process, and the color deepened as the beet juice permeated the cabbage. Isn’t it a beautiful color!

When I pulled it out of the cupboard it had that nice crisp, tangy smell to it. I also tasted some and it tasted crisp, fresh, salty and a little tangy. I’ve been slowly munching my way through it over the past couple weeks and the flavor has matured and become more complex over time – it’s become less salty, more tangy, and the beet is really shining through. It tastes so fresh and alive, I can’t enough of it!

If you’re interested in making this but still feel a little uncertain about some of the steps in the process, I recommend reading my step by step guide to making sauerkraut here.

Lacto-fermented vegetables are a great probiotic food, are so good for you, and really tasty too! Go ahead and try it!

Linking to: Real Food Wednesdays @ Kelly the Kitchen Kop, Healthy 2day Wednesdays @ day2dayjoys, Whole Food Wednesday @ Beyond the Peel, Full Plate Thursdays @ Miz Helen’s, Pennywise Platter Thursdays @ Nourishing Gourmet, Fight Back Friday @ Food Renegade, Freaky Friday @ Real Food Freaks, Friday Food Flicks @ Traditional Foods, Sunday School @ Butter Believer, Monday Mania @ Healthy Home Economist, Homestead Barnhop @ The Prairie Homestead, Make Your Own Mondays, Fat Tuesday @ Real Food Forager, Traditional Tuesdays @ Cooking Traditional Foods

Thai Beef Coconut Soup

I was feeling inspired to make something a little bit different, a little bit exotic this week. Earlier in the week I made beef stock because I had a huge bag of beef bones taking up space in my freezer. I threw in a meaty piece of beef shank for flavor and meat, and got the most gelling stock I’ve ever had in my entire life! My spoon could stand upright in it!

I thought that some red curry paste and coconut milk would go perfectly with the beef, along with butternut squash for sweetness and spinach for some color contrast. The red curry paste gives the soup a nice kick without being overly spicy, while the fish sauce and lime give it that distinctive Thai flavor. We really enjoyed this soup!

Thai Beef Coconut Soup

2 tablespoons oil (ghee/coconut oil)
1 medium onion, sliced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger
2-3 tablespoons Thai red curry paste (start with 2 and add more if you want it spicier)
2 cups (approx.) diced butternut squash – about ½ inch dice
4 cups beef stock
1 can coconut milk
3 tablespoons fish sauce
4-5 button mushrooms, sliced
2-3 cups baby spinach leaves
3/4 lb flat iron steak, thinly sliced (*see note below)
1 large lime – juiced

1. Heat the oil in a large pot on medium heat.
2. Add the onion and sauté for 5 minutes or so until golden.
3. Add the ginger, garlic, curry paste and butternut squash. Mix to coat the butternut squash in the curry paste. Sauté for a couple minutes to bring out the aroma of the spices.
4. Add the beef stock, coconut milk, fish sauce and mushrooms. Bring to a simmer.
5. Simmer until the butternut squash is almost cooked (10-15 minutes), then add the spinach and beef and simmer for 5 minutes more (*see note below regarding the beef).
6. Add lime juice to taste.
7. Ladle into bowls and serve!

*I sliced the flat iron steak very thinly so it only needed 5 minutes to cook in the soup, and it was melt-in-your-mouth tender! To be able to slice it very thin, I put the meat in the freezer for about 20 minutes to get it semi-frozen. If you’re using thicker pieces of uncooked beef, add it to the soup earlier to give it more time to cook.

Linking to: Sunday Night Soup Night!, Monday Mania @ Healthy Home Economist, Homestead Barnhop @ The Prairie, Homestead Make Your Own Mondays, Real Food 101 @ Ruth’s Real Food, Fat Tuesday @ Real Food Forager, Traditional Tuesdays @ Whole New Mom, Real Food Wednesdays @ Kelly the Kitchen Kop, Healthy 2day Wednesdays @ day2dayjoys, Whole Food Wednesday @ Beyond the Peel, Full Plate Thursdays @ Miz Helen’s, Pennywise Platter Thursdays @ Nourishing Gourmet, Fight Back Friday @ Food Renegade, Freaky Friday @ Real Food Freaks, Friday Food Flicks @ Traditional Foods

Sunday Night Soup Night! 2/19/2012

Welcome to Sunday Night Soup Night! I’m really enjoying browsing the selection of soups each week. Coming up with a new soup every week is challenging, but I’m getting great ideas from what you post here. It’s also helping me to think outside of the box and to become more creative. Soup is so wonderfully versatile, almost anything goes!

Thank you for the wonderful selection of soups last week, some of them were really eyecatching! Here are my top 3 pics from last Sunday. I hope you’ll take the time to check them out:

Winter Squash Soup with Sage by Traditional Foods


This winter squash soup offers something a little bit different, with fresh sage leaves and fontina cheese. Looks so good!

Valentine Beet Borscht: Food for the Heart by Gluten Free with Judee


Check out the title of this soup – clever huh?! Apart from that, I love the presentation, and beet borscht is such a healthy soup.

Curried Carrot Soup by Real Food Freaks


The combination of flavors and spices in this Curried Carrot Soup really sold me. Carrots, orange juice, coconut milk, cilantro, garam masala, nutmeg – oh yum!

Sunday Night Soup Night is all about celebrating the goodness of wonderful homemade soups and stocks. Warm, tasty soup, made from homemade stock can be a complete and highly nourishing meal. And also an easy and convenient one!

So come join in the fun and share this celebration:
– Link up a recipe for homemade soup, stock/broth or chowder.
– Or you may have a post your wish to share about your tips/methods for making great soups and stocks, or information about the benefits of nourishing soups and bone broths.
– Or simply get inspired by checking out the links from other bloggers.
– If you see something that you like, leave a comment for that person on their blog and let them know you found them through Sunday Night Soup Night! It’s always great to get positive feedback 🙂

Carnival Guidelines:
1) Please, no bouillon or commercial stock/broth! Soup made from homemade stock/bone broth is so much more nourishing than anything you can buy in the supermarket. If you’re not sure how to make your own stock, here are a few great posts on stock-making that have been linked to this carnival (I will rotate the links each week to highlight different stock recipes):

Chicken Stock by Nourishing Food Ways
How to Make Beef Stock by Our Nourishing Roots
Incredible Healing Properties of Broth by Nourish to Flourish

2) Whole, unprocessed foods only please! Low-fat milk, bad fats such as margarine and other processed vegetable oils, soy products (other than traditionally fermented soy foods such as soy sauce, tempeh, miso etc) are not ok. Minimally processed canned foods such as tomatoes, coconut milk, pumpkin, etc are ok.

I’m looking for soups that embrace real food principles and traditional food techniques such as homemade stock. Soups that will nourish, heal, and keep you in good health 🙂

3) Please provide a link back to Sunday Night Soup Night on your post.

4) Link up using the Linky tool below:
– Make sure you link the URL of your actual blog post and not your blog’s home page.
– Enter the title of your post instead of your name in the Name field


Moroccan Lamb Stew


If you can get lamb stew meat, there is no tastier stew meat in the whole world! (in my humble opinion. But then again I do hail from a country where sheep outnumber people by a rather startling factor!)

This recipe for a Moroccan-style lamb stew comes from the Nourishing Traditions cookbook, although I have modified it a little to suit the ingredients I have on hand. I have also halved the original recipe for our small family. But halved or not, it is de-lish-iss!

This recipe is naturally gluten free, grain free, and is suitable for the GAPS diet provided you leave out the potatoes (which is my addition – the Nourishing Traditions recipe does not use potatoes).

So get yourself some lamb, and make yourself some stew!

Morrocan Lamb Stew

1.5 pounds lamb stew meat, cut into 2-inch chunks
3 cloves garlic, peeled and mashed
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 1/2 teaspoons freshly grated ginger
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
2 teaspoons lemon juice
1 cup stock (beef or lamb)
2 small/medium potatoes, cut into bite-size pieces (substitute with carrots for GAPS)
Grated rind of 1 lemon
8-10 black or kalmata olives, pitted and sliced
1/2 cup pitted prunes or dried apricots, chopped
Chopped cilantro for garnish (optional)

1. Make a mixture of the garlic, olive oil, cumin, ginger, salt, turmeric, paprika, cinnamon and pepper and lemon juice.
2. Place lamb pieces in a casserole dish and marinate for several hours or overnight.
3. Heat oven to 300F
4. Mix the stock and potatoes in with the lamb
5. Cover the casserole dish and place in the oven.
6. Cover and bake at 300F for about 2 hours or until meat is tender.
7. Stir in the olives, prunes/apricots* and lemon rind, and bake uncovered for a further 20-30 minutes.
8. Serve with optional cilantro.

*Note: I’ve tried this recipe with both prunes and apricots, and I can’t decide which one I like better! Both are really tasty.

Linking to: Fight Back Friday @ Food Renegade, Freaky Friday @ Real Food Freaks, Pennywise Platter Thursdays @ Nourishing Gourmet, Friday Food Flicks @ Traditional Foods, Monday Mania @ Healthy Home Economist, Homestead Barnhop @ The Prairie, Homestead Make Your Own Mondays, Real Food 101 @ Ruth’s Real Food, Fat Tuesday @ Real Food Forager, Traditional Tuesdays @ Whole New Mom, Real Food Wednesdays @ Kelly the Kitchen Kop, Healthy 2day Wednesdays @ day2dayjoys, Whole Food Wednesday @ Beyond the Peel, Full Plate Thursdays @ Miz Helen’s, Pennywise Platter Thursdays @ Nourishing Gourmet

Cranberry, Carrot and Celery Slaw

Cranberry Carrot SlawI made this simple slaw to go with our dinner the other night. I didn’t feel like the usual green salad, but I wanted a raw side dish as opposed to cooked vegetables. I actually didn’t have a lot on hand to choose from, but I nearly always have carrots and celery in the fridge, and cranberries in the pantry. These things are fridge/pantry staples for me, so I’m not sure why I haven’t married them up before now. But what a tasty trio they make!

The icing on the cake for this salad was my homemade mayo, which I have recently started making. I can’t believe it’s taken me 3 (maybe 4?) years into my real food journey to attempt to make my own mayonnaise! But it’s so easy to do, it tastes so wonderful and it’s soooo healthy compared to store-bought mayo.

Cranberry, Carrot and Celery Slaw

1 large carrot, peeled and grated
2 celery ribs, thinly sliced
ÂĽ cup dried cranberries
ÂĽ cup (approx.) homemade mayonnaise
Pepper – couple shakes

Mix all ingredients together in a bowl!

You can use your favorite homemade mayonnaise, or here’s my recipe if you need one:

Homemade Mayo

Makes 1 cup
1 whole egg, at room temperature (important to use a good quality egg from a pastured hen!)
1 1/2 teaspoons prepared mustard (plain or Dijon)
1/8 teaspoon sea salt
1 1/2 teaspoons (approx) liquid raw honey
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil (or blend of olive and expeller-pressed sunflower oil)

1. Blend egg, mustard, salt, honey and lemon juice until smooth (I use an immersion blender).
2. While the immersion blender is running on low, hold it with one hand and slowly pour in the olive oil with your other hand until all oil has been poured in. By the time you’re finished pouring, the mayonnaise will have magically thickened!.
3. Check seasonings and add more salt/lemon juice/mustard/honey to taste.
4. Pour into a jar and store in the fridge where it will keep for up to two weeks.

Note: If you don’t have an immersion blender, you can also make this in a food processor by slowly pouring in the oil through the opening while the motor is running.

Linking to: Fat Tuesday @ Real Food Forager, Traditional Tuesdays @ Whole New Mom, Real Food Wednesdays @ Kelly the Kitchen Kop, Healthy 2day Wednesdays @ day2dayjoys, Whole Food Wednesday @ Beyond the Peel, Full Plate Thursdays @ Miz Helen’s, Pennywise Platter Thursdays @ Nourishing Gourmet, Freaky Friday @ Real Food Freaks, Homestead Barnhop @ The Prairie, Homestead Make Your Own Mondays, Simple Lives Thursday, Fight Back Friday, Foodie Friday

Valentines Day Progressive Dinner Party – Desserts!

I’m a bit late to the party, having missed the rest of the courses of this wonderful Valentines Day progressive dinner which has been hosted by members of the Nourished Living Network. But better late than never! And trust me to arrive just in time for dessert 🙂

Adrienne and Whole New Mom shares her Healthy Almond Joy Bars and Chocolate Chip Macadamia Cookies.

Debbie at Easy Natural Food has prepared her Apple and Blackberry Crumble.

Lea at Nourishing Treasures offers Pumpkin Cookies and Coconut-Orange Macaroons.

The Nourishing Home has made Decadent Fudgy Brownies!

Lydia at Divine Health shares her Cherry Chocolate Walnut Bliss.

KerryAnn from Cooking Traditional Foods brings you her Decadent Chocolate Truffles, Grain-Free Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies, and Three Minute Ice Cream- Three Flavors.

Finally, Jessica at Delicious Obsessions shares with you her Pumpkin Bread (Gluten and Grain Free), Healthy Homemade Peanut Butter Cups, Warm Chinese Pears With Cinnamon and Nuts or Bananas Foster with Dairy-free Vanilla Ice Cream, Easy Bread Pudding, and Chocolate Peanut Butter Cookies – Gluten Free.

 

Sausage Noodle Soup


I had been planning a chicken noodle soup, but I didn’t have any chicken on hand! So it morphed into a sausage noodle soup instead 🙂

I think my husband’s all time favorite soup is a noodle soup, so I can’t believe it’s taken me this long to post one. When I think of how he’s patiently sat through all of my other soup experiments, I feel quite bad that I had neglected to make his favorite. But I finally did….and it was good!

I used thin rice noodles because I don’t eat gluten, and because we really like the thin rice noodles. They just seem to melt in your mouth!

This soup would be just as good with chicken meat, but we really enjoyed the sausage so I’d definitely make it that way again. I used a chicken bratwurst, but you could use any kind of uncooked sausage that you like.

Sausage Noodle Soup

Serves 3-4
2 tablespoons oil (ghee/coconut oil)
1 large onion, sliced
3 uncooked sausages (about 1 pound)
3-4 cloves garlic, minced
2 celery ribs
4-5 white button mushrooms
1 teaspoon sea salt (or to taste)
Pepper – couple shakes
6 cups chicken stock
½ large bunch (approx) kale – ribs removed, chopped
4 oz (1/2 pack) maifun rice noodles

1. Cut the sausage into bite-size pieces (I prefer to remove the sausage from its casing first).
2. Heat oil in a large pot. Add the onions and sauté until golden.
3. Add sausage pieces and garlic to the pot. Saute for about 10 minutes until sausage has browned on all sides.
4. Add the celery, mushrooms, salt and pepper and sauté for a few minutes.
5. Add chicken stock, bring to a boil then simmer for about 5 minutes.
6. Add kale and simmer, partially covered, for 8-10 minutes.
7. Add noodles and simmer for another 2-3 minutes.
8. Serve and enjoy!

Linking to: Sunday Night Soup Night, Sunday School @ Butter Believer, Monday Mania @ Healthy Home Economist, Homestead Barnhop @ The Prairie Homestead, Make Your Own Mondays, Real Food 101 @ Ruth’s Real Food, Fat Tuesday @ Real Food Forager, Traditional Tuesdays @ Whole New Mom, Real Food Wednesdays @ Kelly the Kitchen Kop, Healthy 2day Wednesdays @ day2dayjoys, Whole Food Wednesday @ Beyond the Peel, Full Plate Thursdays @ Miz Helen’s, Pennywise Platter Thursdays @ Nourishing Gourmet, Fight Back Friday @ Food Renegade, Freaky Friday @ Real Food Freaks

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